Charity enamel pin for Yemen crisis 2020
Charity enamel pin for Yemen crisis 2020
Charity enamel pin for Yemen crisis 2020
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Charity enamel pin for Yemen crisis 2020

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50% of profits of this enamel pin will be donated straight to https://www.muslimglobalrelief.org/yemen-appeal/ to help end the horrific crisis in Yemen.


What's Happening to Yemen in 2020:

You may have seen posts circulating on Instagram for the past month to raise awareness of the current crisis in Yemen. Yemen, officially the Republic of Yemen, is a country in the middle east, situated at the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia, it is one of the area’s poorest countries and has a population of approximately 28.5 million people. The reason that people are calling for attention on social media is that right now, more than 24 million people—which is approximately 80 per cent of Yemen’s population—is in need of some form of humanitarian assistance. This means that Yemen is currently facing the biggest humanitarian crisis in the world—here’s what you need to know.


What is happening in Yemen?

Although social media has turned its attention to Yemen in the past month, the country’s plight is nothing new. Essentially, Yemen has been experiencing the impact of a civil war that has been going on for years and intensified after Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi overthrew Ali Abdullah Saleh as president, following an Arab Spring uprising in 2011. As The Guardian’s diplomatic editor, Patrick Wintour notes: “Yemen has been troubled by civil wars for decades, but the current conflict intensified in March 2015 when a Saudi-led coalition intervened on behalf of the internationally recognised government against Houthi rebels aligned with the former president Ali Abdullah Saleh.” This even forced President Hadi to flee the country in 2015, though his government has since returned and established an office in Aden, which is now considered the temporary capital of Yemen. But as per the BBC, the president has “struggled to deal with a variety of problems” throughout his presidency, which they note as corruption, unemployment and food insecurity, as well as attacks by jihadists and a number of separatist movements.


This ongoing civil war in Yemen escalated again in January 2020, with conflict between the Houthis and coalition-led forces intensifying further. Now, the Covid-19 pandemic is taking hold in Yemen too. Not-for-profit organisation UNICEF says this has resulted in the country becoming a “living hell”—but particularly so for the country’s children.


What has caused the humanitarian crisis in Yemen?

Living through a decades-long civil war has had a severe impact on life in Yemen—aside from the danger of air raids, missile strikes and other byproducts of a war, the social impacts are devastating too. The conflict has left millions of people displaced, or without access to shelter, clean water, health care, medical supplies or even sanitation. As per a UNICEF report, this has meant that approximately 24 million people in Yemen, or 80 per cent of the population, are in need of some kind of humanitarian assistance, including more than 12 million children—nearly half the population of Australia—at least 2 million of which are malnourished.


How is the coronavirus pandemic impacting the situation in Yemen?

As aforementioned, conflict in the country intensified at the beginning of 2020, causing the humanitarian crisis to also intensify, as the spread of Covid-19 began around the world. UNICEF calls the coronavirus pandemic spreading to Yemen “an emergency within an emergency.” That’s because it’s incredibly difficult to stem the spread of a pandemic virus when, for example, clean water is in short supply, or when a country is already coping with other diseases—in Yemen’s case: dengue fever, malaria and cholera.


In addition to this, due to the war, the country’s healthcare system has all but collapsed and the BBC reports that of Yemen’s 3,500 medical facilities, only half are thought to be fully functioning, due to damage from the civil war conflicts. As Covid-19 spreads, these medical facilities are overcrowded, there is a lack of medicines and supplies, and only a few hundred ventilator machines for the 28.5 million people who live there. UNICEF reports that many health workers are receiving no salaries or incentives to perform their duties, which have to be done without protections like gloves or masks.


At the time of writing, there have been 1190 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 318 deaths, though experts say the actual number of coronavirus cases is unknown but likely to be much higher.


What can be done to help?

In its report, UNICEF states that it has shipped medical supplies and equipment to Yemen, including 18,000 Covid-19 tests, more than 33,000 N95 respirators, 33,000 face shields, and 18,000 gowns and is also working on training around 30,000 health workers in infection prevention and control. You can donate to these initiatives here. A number of other charities and organisations are also raising funds to donate urgent supplies to Yemen, including Save The Children, Oxfam, Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) and the UN Refugee Agency.

FROM: https://www.vogue.com.au/culture/features/yemen-is-experiencing-the-biggest-humanitarian-crisis-in-the-world-heres-what-to-know/news-story/1ab62a1e291daa5dfcc270f53f433fc2